Monday, July 22, 2019

The Ins And Outs Of Disc Golf Clubs Part 4 - What Now?


As with many things in life, the process of taking an idea and turning it into a reality within the disc golf world can take a long time. From the first inkling of inspiration to actually formalizing your plans, it takes a dedicated effort to make a difference in the sport, whether it’s starting a league, installing a new course, or creating a disc golf club.

In this blog series, we’re tackling the last option on that list and reviewing what’s needed to create and run a disc golf club step by step. If you’re just now joining us, head back to our first three blogs to learn how to formalize your group, understand the importance of a solid set of board members, and more. Today, we’re all about getting to the heart and soul of your club - how do you actually utilize this structure to accomplish your goals?

Taking Care Of Business

Running a disc golf club sounds like it’s all fun and games, but there are actual decisions to make on a regular basis. Most clubs have a very set schedule for their meetings and work up agendas to make sure they cover the various aspects of what they’re trying to accomplish. While you don’t have to devote enough time to your meetings to make it feel like a second job, there is an element of professionalism that should permeate each gathering.

Chris Eads, who offered some valuable information in Part 3 of this series, explained how his club tends to operate:

“Our meetings mostly consisted of turning in mini money and discussing upcoming tournaments and the needs of those events. We currently run 7 events a year and we maintain 10 courses that we use for these events and weekly minis.

We use the public library as our meeting place because it is free and is pretty centralized for all parties that wish to attend. When running a meeting it is always important to stay focused on the tasks at hand. We have someone who creates minutes for us so that we can look back on previously discussed topics and also future topics that need to be addressed.”

Innovation And Growth

Not only are disc golf club meetings great for maintaining your club’s current happenings, but they also create the ideal platform to introduce new ideas. Latitude 64 team member Luke Wessel is a part of the Apple Valley Disc Golf League in Apple Valley, MN. While we’ve learned that a club and a league are two very different things, he mentioned some interesting ideas that he implemented just after joining which could easily transfer over to a club setting: “I picked up where they left off but started doing things behind the scenes like digitizing records and helping to boost payouts and prizes.”

Disc golf clubs are one of the best ways to bring exciting ideas to the table to not only keep your members engaged but also to attract new people to the sport and help to grow your local community. Keep your eyes out for Part 5 of this series where we learn how clubs actually make money!
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