Monday, July 3, 2017

Can Plastic Type Really Affect The Flight Of Your Disc?

If you’ve been playing disc golf for even a short period of time, you probably understand that as the weight and characteristics of a disc change so does that disc’s flight capabilities. But what many may not realize is that the various types of plastics used during the manufacturing process might also play a huge factor.

Your disc’s plastic type can potentially alter the stability or glide just as much as any other variable would, and this can lead to some confusion among beginning players. Let’s do a quick review of the DD plastic and how you might expect your discs to fly based on what type of plastic they’re made from.

The DD Lineup

Dynamic Discs has a solid array of plastic types to meet just about everyone’s needs. For those who need a refresher, here’s what we have available:

  • Classic - This is best known as our baseline or entry level plastic. It offers a good grip and will beat into a very smooth and soft turnover disc after just a few laps around the track. Classic makes a great choice for putters and midrange discs, especially if you like cycling discs at various stages of wear and tear. 
  • Prime - Offering many of the same benefits of Classic plastic, our Prime discs give players an improved grip and more durability. You’ll still get that same beat in flight after a while, but Prime will hold up a little longer when it comes to wear and tear. 
  • Lucid - We love this plastic and so do the pros! As one of our premium plastics, Lucid discs take durability to the next level. Many players opt for Lucid discs not only for their trusted performance but because their translucent effect looks pretty great in the air. 
  • Fuzion - This line builds upon the premium plastic platform of durability and strength just like the Lucid discs. Fuzion plastic will give you a great grip as well as the added look of a shimmery shine. 
  • BioFuzion - Some prefer the less expensive and economical choice in BioFuzion plastic which is made from grinding up deformed and misprinted discs into a recycled plastic. This results in a disc that is not as durable as Fuzion but still offers a great product. 
  • Fluid - Fluid plastic offers the same durability and look that has made the Lucid line so successful but has a softer, almost gummy like quality that makes the disc extremely grippy. Dynamic Discs’ Fluid line is also the perfect choice for playing in colder weather which normally makes it hard to get a good firm grip on your disc. Our Fluid line plastic will stiffen up but remain soft and save you strokes during those cold winter rounds.

How’s Your Flight?

So the ultimate question is: does your plastic choice affect the flight of your disc, and more importantly, influence your disc purchasing decisions? Many might say yes, as the durability and grip you get on certain plastics can give you a more trusted and accurate shot than others.

Still, other players might feel that plastic types are more about comfort in the hand and durability in your bag, and the flight of your disc comes from your own skills as a player. How do you think plastic type plays into your game? Let us know in the comments below.
11 comments:
  1. I really like the Lucid because it is durable and I can count on a consistent flight pattern because of that. Great work Dynamic!

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  2. That's a good synopsis of plastic types, but how do those plastic types fly out of the box? Which plastic is more stable? Less stable? Has more glide?

    Personally, I like classic for putters, biofuzion for Truths, lucid or fuzion for other stable to understable discs, and biofuzion for overstable discs, like the felon, defender, and enforcer.

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  3. I throw multiple plastics and molds from DD. I expect the Classics and Blends to turn into turnover discs, and cycle them regularly. The fuzion plastic holds it stability for a very long time. I like the grip of the lucid in all weather types. All great plastics, for all different shots.

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  6. I think moonshine are more stable and I know a lot of people say metal flake disc fly different as well

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  7. This article should have been titled, "What are the different plastics offerec by Dynamic Discs?"

    This article posed a question at the start about plastic vs flight. The question is restated at the end without even an unproven hypothesis about different plastic types having more/less glide, fade, etc.

    Nothing about this article discussed how different plastics affect a disc's flight. I'm a big fan of durability (ie Vibram) so I like durability of each plastic. Perhaps this should have been an article on durability.

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  8. jzap says. . . I bought a lucid truth to replace a truth i lost. i never knew what plastic of that one i lost. i ended up buying the wrong plastic bc it flew horribly. nothing like my original truth. come to find out, the truth i losst was a fuzion emac lol. now i'm crushing it!! yea, plastic matters big time!

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  9. Well, it is like with Innova discs plastics I see two things here.
    1. baseline plastics fly more true to their numbers for new players and less powerful arms, for example a dx Valkyrie will fly as you might expect it too 9/5/-2/2 from the start, where as the star Valkyrie or champion Valkyrie will definitely need some time to break in before you get it to flip up and flex a little.
    2. Dynamic discs numbers to me seem to be what a new arm or player might expect right out of the box compared to Innova.
    Example, a tl3 is similar to a teebird, it is 8/5/0/1, and it takes a while for it to fly like that in star or champ plastic, but a dynamic discs thief is a 8/5/0/2, but in fluid plastic flies just like the numbers indicate, mine on its very first throw went straight out and had a late flex to the right before returning to the left for a gentle fade, it took a full year for my tl3 or teebird to do that in any plastic, so it seems to me that the dynamic discs numbers are more what anyone can expect the disc to do the day you buy it and Innova numbers except for dx are what you can expect the disc to do after a long break in period unless you have a pro arm and arm speed.
    Ive been an Innova guy from day 1 and I still am, however I do bag a few D&D discs now and I do find them to be more reliable as far as their flight patterns are concerned from the start, I know if I buy a dynamic disc I can expect it to fly as advertised from the day I get it.
    So much so that I replaced my Valkyries with escapes and I carry a thief for a fairway driver where I need a little flex and dont have a broken in tl3.
    Both companies make great discs!!

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  10. I recently committed my entire bag to DD, Latitude, and Westside, which has forced me to really focus on what products work the best for me in this manufacturer's range. First off, I must state, that I have been more than satisfied with the disc variety/ selection from the three companies. My take, however, on the different type of plastics really comes down to how they work for you as an individual.
    I throw a PRIME JUDGE...the best putter I have ever thrown! Now that's not the "best" plastic that DD makes but it works extremely well for me. Then on the other end of the specterum I throw a LUCID EMAC TRUTH; either plastic does for me what I need it to do. Even though this article doesn't address flight habits per plastic it does describe the characteristics of the plastic themselves. To describe flight patterns would be arbitrary at best.
    Thanks DD, you make great stuff.
    -JOSH

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  11. Different plastics cool at different rates. According to the excellent explanation in the video below (please pardon references to another brand; it's just the best explanation I've seen so far regarding plastic types). Does Bio Fusion cool faster than Classic? That will affect the stability. It's something that can be known and reported on from the factory. It would be nice if this article could be edited to reflect cooling variations between the plastics. That could be a general indicator regarding stability of an individual mold across multiple plastics. It is acknowledged that cooling rate is one of possibly dozens of factors affecting final wing height of a disc. However, this article is about plastic lines affecting disc stability and something general could be very useful.

    Thanks DD, keep being you and doing what you do

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=By0CFQwVUT0

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